0007. Pentatonics as superimpositions โ€“ abilities and techniques, part 2

Pentatonic-based chords could be controlled melodically. They behave pretty much as inversions of triads; just have significantly more of chord tones (what makes them supermelodic!).

Let`s pick five three-voiced fragments of the pentatonic, deployed widely, as discussed earlier. Those all have different melodic degrees:

b3 5 1*
4 b7 b3
5 1 4
b7 b3 5
1 4 b7

*Bold digits could be considered as roots of different kinds of “pentatonic triadsโ€.

Notice that tones in columns are deployed narrowly (1 b3 4 5 b7 1 etc.). This could be used for melodic motion, without huge interval leaps.

Tones in rows remain deployed widely, as common chords (1 4 b7 b3 5 1 etc.).

In video this idea should look clearer.

Widely deployed pentatonic triads are always less than octave in range and could be inverted for greater intervalic variety:

4 5 1 4 b7 1
5 b7 b3 5 1 b3
b7 1 4 b7 b3 4
1 b3 5 1 4 5
b3 4 b7 b3 5 b7

Do not get fooled by numerous shapes โ€“ they are just the same initial pentatonic, just used with some sense and purpose.

Any tone of inversion also could be displaced by an octave โ€“ for even greater range and intervalic variety.

I know all this information might seem puzzling at first, especially when we deal with not only one, but three different kinds of pentatonic and use them as superimpositions over other chords. But proper classification of pentatonic triads and focus on right spots makes the whole system accessible to many. Ask my students. ๐Ÿ™‚

If you got the idea and are interested in fully detailed course or want to share your thoughts, contact me directly advancedharmonyblog@gmail.com

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